National Origin Discrimination

The federal statute most commonly known as Title VII, prohibits employers from discriminating against employees because of their national origin. In other words, an employer cannot take adverse employment actions or allow a hostile work environment to affect an employee because he or she was born in a country other than the United States, or if he or she is descended from people born outside of the United States. If you prove that your employer has violated Title VII, then you are entitled to lost wages, compensatory and punitive damages, and attorneys’ fees. The compensatory and punitive damages are capped at certain amounts depending on the size of the employer.

If you suspect that you have been the victim of national origin discrimination in the work place, please call (470) 823-4000.

Every federal statute that prohibits discrimination in the workplace has an anti-retaliation provision. As such, it is unlawful for an employee to be retaliated against for opposing perceived discrimination or participating in an EEOC investigation regarding such discrimination. In other words, if you believe you were discriminated against and you complained to your supervisor about such discrimination and then the employer took an adverse employment action against you because of that report, that retaliatory act is unlawful. The same is true for co-workers who report discrimination or otherwise provide information regarding discrimination on behalf of a fellow employee. If you successfully demonstrate that your employer unlawfully retaliated against you, you are entitled to lost wages, compensatory and punitive damages (that may be capped depending on the number of employees), and attorneys’ fees.