Am I Entitled to Overtime Pay?

How do you know if you are getting paid properly?  If you are working for a company as an “independent contractor,” gig worker, “freelancer” or some other non-employee label, the company may be denying you important rights that it owes to workers it legally should call its employees.

The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was enacted to protect American workers. What does that mean today: employment is NOT a pay as you wish arrangement. Laws define employee rights, not companies.

Many people believe that, just because a company designates you an “independent contractor,” “freelancer,” or “non-employee,” that means you are not protected by the minimum wage and overtime laws. That is not true.

Whether you are protected by the overtime laws depends on the reality of your relationship with the company, not on how the company labels you or the documents the company has you sign. For example, even if you signed an “independent contractor agreement,” you may still be legally entitled to overtime pay depending on the reality of your relationship with the company.

Legare, Attwood & Wolfe can quickly help you figure out whether you might be wrongly labeled as a contractor, gig worker, or freelancer, and whether you might be legally entitled to more compensation than the company has paid you.

Want to know more?  Contact Us to evaluate your situation.