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Has MARTA Missed the Mark?

SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE NEWS

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) gives very clear guidance on its website about how employers should handle claims of harassment, including those of sexual harassment.

 

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution took a look into MARTA’s handling of sexual harassment complaints and here is what they found:  MARTA rejects almost all sexual harassment claims.

The EEOC lists these as steps a company should take when investigating a complaint of harassment:

“An employer should conduct a prompt, thorough, and impartial investigation. The alleged harasser should not have any direct or indirect control over the investigation.

The investigator should interview the employee who complained of harassment, the alleged harasser, and others who could reasonably be expected to have relevant information. The Guidance provides examples of specific questions that may be appropriate to ask.

Before completing the investigation, the employer should take steps to make sure that harassment does not continue. If the parties have to be separated, then the separation should not burden the employee who has complained of harassment. An involuntary transfer of the complainant could constitute unlawful retaliation. Other examples of interim measures are making scheduling changes to avoid contact between the parties or placing the alleged harasser on non-disciplinary leave with pay pending the conclusion of the investigation.”

               Source:  EEOC.gov Jan 28 2020

Shyanne Lord is represented by Steve Wolfe.  To read about the complaints she made to MARTA, read the facts as outlined in her lawsuit.  See allegations, beginning on page 5.

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